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Puppy Growth Chart – Dog Weight Chart By Age And Breed

Puppy Growth Charts
Written by Adriana

If you are thinking about making an addition to your family in the form of a new puppy then there a few things you must consider to ensure that both you and your new pup are comfortable.

For instance, it may be beneficial to consult a puppy growth chart first, so you can get a good idea of what to expect as your pup develops.

Since accommodation is a major concern for many dog parents, the need to anticipate your puppy’s size and growth rate is crucial.

For example, the approximate size of your pup is useful when you need to make decisions such as the type of crate you need to purchase to transport him.

It also comes in handy when allocating a designated area for rest or play.

To make accurate predictions of your puppy size in the future, we have formulated a few guidelines for how long puppies will take to grow, how dog breed affects the size throughout development, and approximate prediction of the pup’s adult weight.

Is A Dog Full Grown At 12 Months? 

When Is A Dog Full Grown

There is no simple answer to this question as it depends on the dog. For example, small dog breeds like Chihuahuas usually reach their full size by 10 -12 months.

On the other hand, small-medium dog breeds like Beagles, Miniature Schnauzers, and Toy Poodles will complete their growth by about 12-15 months and will have attained their full weight by around 18 months.

Medium to large dog breeds such as Boxers, Labrador Retrievers, and Collies are usually full-grown at around 18 months and at 2 years old they would have attained their full weight. Giant dog breeds are fully grown into their paws by about 18 months.

Generally for giant dog breeds, a good way to tell is the size of their paws. Big dog breeds have oversized paws that look disproportional to the rest of the body when they are puppies.

They have a more proportional body, after fully “growing into” their paws. Remember that the timeline for each pet will differ.

Toy Breed Puppy Growth Chart

Birth Weight 2.5 oz 3.5 oz 4.5 oz 5.5 oz 6.5 oz
Age
1 week 3.5 oz 6 oz 9 oz 10 oz 12 oz
2 weeks 5 oz 7 oz 12 oz 14 oz 18 oz
4 weeks 8 oz 12 oz 18 oz 22 oz 24 oz
6 weeks 10 oz 16 oz 24 oz 29 oz 34 oz
8 weeks 12 oz 20 oz 29 oz 35 oz 42 oz
10 weeks 14 oz 23 oz 33 oz 40 oz 47 oz
12 weeks 16 oz 27 oz 39 oz 47 oz 55 oz
14 weeks 18 oz 31 oz 45 oz 52 oz 62 oz
16 weeks 20 oz 35 oz 52 oz 59 oz 72 oz
18 weeks 22 oz 38 oz 54 oz 67 oz 78 oz
20 weeks 24 oz 42 oz 58 oz 72 oz 82 oz
22 weeks 26 oz 44 oz 62 oz 76 oz 86 oz
24 weeks 28 oz 46 oz 66 oz 78 oz 90 oz
Adult Weight 1.75 lbs 3.5 lbs 5 lbs 6 lbs 7 lbs

The Toy breeds include dog breeds such as Chihuahua, Toy Poodle, Shih Tzu, Maltese, Havanese, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Pomeranian, Miniature Pinscher, and Yorkie.

On average, Toy breeds add about 5 – 10% to their body weight every day. This amounts to roughly around 1 – 6 oz per week.

Smaller dogs tend to develop much faster than larger dogs do and usually attain their adult weight at 8-9 months of age. 

The following chart helps to illustrate the future weight of your toy puppy, and it works with its birth weight. Even if you are unaware of your puppy’s birth weight, you’ll still be able to estimate his adult weight. 

All you need to do is look for his age that will be located along the left column of the puppy weight chart. Then all you need to do is find the nearest associated weight at that age.

Next, you should go down that column to see what he will weigh as an adult or every milestone along the way. 

Calculating The Adult Weight Of A Toy Breed Puppy

Toy Breed Puppy Weight Chart

To calculate your toy puppy’s adult weight another way you can take his weight at 6-weeks old, double it, then double it again.

Most of us probably won’t know what his weight was at that age is, so you can use our dog weight chart by age and breed to help you. Simply look for his current age and weight and work back. 

For example, if a 12-week old puppy weighs 16 ounces, as seen in the chart, his 6-week weight was probably between 10 – 12 ounces.

You should double that to 20 – 24 ounces then, double that again to between 40 – 48 ounces. 

Small Breed Puppy Growth Chart

Age Weight Weight Weight
8 weeks 2 lbs 3 lbs 4 lbs
10 weeks 2.5 lbs 4 lbs 5.5 lbs
12 weeks 3.5 lbs 5 lbs 6.5 lbs
14 weeks 4 lbs 6 lbs 7.5 lbs
16 weeks 4.5 lbs 7 lbs 9 lbs
5 months 6 lbs 8.5 lbs 12 lbs
6 months 7 lbs 10 lbs 14 lbs
7 months 8 lbs 11.5 lbs 16 lbs
8 months 9 lbs 13.5 lbs 18 lbs
10 months 11 lbs 16.5 lbs 22 lbs
12 months 13 lbs 20 lbs 27 lbs

Even though they typically don’t develop as fast as the toy versions, small dogs still grow faster than large dogs. 

They attain their adult weight at around 8-12 months. These include dog breeds like Jack Russell Terrier, Bolognese, French Bulldog, Cocker Spaniel, and Boston Terrier.

There is some overlap with the toy breed size, especially at the lower end of that scale and the medium-sized dogs at the higher end.

But generally, the small breeds comprise dogs between 12 and 25 lbs. Small breeds usually gain weight at a rate of 5-10% increase each day which comes up to approximately 5-8 ounces per week.

You can use this detailed small dog weight chart to estimate the future size of your small puppy. Simply find the weight closest to your puppy’s age and go down that column to see the age at 12 months, which likely will be his adult weight.

For instance, if you have a 16-week old puppy that weighs 7lbs, follow the weight down that column to see where he/she will be about 20 lbs when fully grown.

Calculating The Adult Weight Of A Small Breed Puppy

Small Breed Puppy Weight Chart

If your dog’s weight or age isn’t on the puppy growth chart you can simply find the average. For example, you need to find the average of the two, if your puppy is in between two weights for his age.

To determine his adult weight another thing you can do is to find your puppy’s growth rate and times that by 52. That is if you don’t mind a bit of math. 

You know his growth rate by finding out how much weight he gains in one week. This is found by calculating his current weight and dividing this by his age in weeks.  

Medium Breed Puppy Growth Chart

Age Weight Weight Weight
8 weeks 5 lbs 6 lbs 8 lbs
10 weeks 6.5 lbs 8 lbs 10.5 lbs
12 weeks 8 lbs 10 lbs 12 lbs
14 weeks 9.5 lbs 12 lbs 15 lbs
16 weeks 11 lbs 14 lbs 17 lbs
5 months 14 lbs 18 lbs 23 lbs
6 months 17 lbs 20 lbs 27 lbs
7 months 19 lbs 23 lbs 31 lbs
8 months 22 lbs 27 lbs 36 lbs
10 months 27 lbs 33 lbs 43 lbs
12 months 33 lbs 40 lbs 53 lbs

At around 9-10 months of age, medium dogs usually attain 99% of their adult weight. Generally, the medium breed types are comprised of breeds that are around 25 -50 lbs.

It should go without saying that there is some overlap with the large size dogs at the higher end and the small breed size at the lower end of that scale. 

Medium breed dogs include beautiful breeds like the English Bulldog, Australian Cattle Dog, Bull Terrier, Border Collie, Chow Chow, and Corgi.

You will be able to use the following medium dog growth chart to estimate the future weight of your puppy at his fully grown stage. The chart works basically in the same way, but there are different measurements for dogs that are in the medium-size category.  

Another great benefit of using the chart estimations is that you will also be able to see how much he’ll weigh at each major milestone, in his life.

It is easy to use the chart! Simply look for your puppy’s age along the left side column, then look for where he falls based on his current weight. 

Therefore, if your pup is 12 weeks old and weighs 8 lbs, then follow that column down to the “12-month” row, which in this case is 33 lbs.

This will be the approximate weight of your pup as an adult. Don’t worry, if your puppy’s age or weight isn’t listed on the chart because there are still a few things you can do to determine his adult weight.

Calculating The Adult Weight Of A Medium Breed Puppy

Medium Breed Puppy Weight Chart

To determine the adult weight of a medium breed pup when he is between two weights for his age, you need to find the average of the two weights. You also have the option of using your puppy’s growth rate.

First, you will need to figure out your puppy’s growth rate which is his current weight in lbs divided by his current age in weeks. Next, you should multiply the growth rate by 52. The result is the estimated weight of your puppy as an adult.

If you know your medium breed puppy’s weight at 14 weeks, you can use this method of calculating the adult weight. Firstly, you should weigh him at 14 weeks, then multiply this amount by 2. The next step is to add this figure to half the weight at 14 weeks.

Large Breed Puppy Growth Chart

Age Weight Weight Weight
8 weeks 11 lbs 13 lbs 15 lbs
10 weeks 14 lbs 17 lbs 19 lbs
12 weeks 17 lbs 20 lbs 23 lbs
14 weeks 20 lbs 23 lbs 27 lbs
16 weeks 23 lbs 27 lbs 29 lbs
5 months 31 lbs 36 lbs 31 lbs
6 months 36 lbs 43 lbs 42 lbs
7 months 42 lbs 49 lbs 57 lbs
8 months 48 lbs 57 lbs 66 lbs
10 months 60 lbs 64 lbs 82 lbs
12 months 72 lbs 85 lbs 98 lbs
18 months 105 lbs 125 lbs 145 lbs

To reach their full adult weight, large breed dogs take at least 12-18 months. Generally, large breed dogs are comprised of breeds that are between 50 and 100 lbs.

That said, there may be some overlap with the giant size dogs at the higher end and the medium breed size at the lower end of that scale.

Large breed dogs are comprised of dog breeds such as Doberman Pinscher, Akita, Boxer, Labrador Retriever, Belgian Malinois, German Shepherd Dog, and American Bulldog to name a few.

You can use the following large breed puppy growth chart to estimate the weight of your puppy at full-grown age. Keep in mind that this is an estimate, so you will get a rough idea based on his current weight.

If you wish to use the puppy weight chart, then start with your puppy’s age within the left side column, then based on his current weight, look for the figure that is associated with his age in the adjacent columns.

With large breed dogs, you need to keep in mind that they keep growing past the one-year mark, so they might maintain their continual growth until they are 18 months old. If they keep growing until 18 months, some large breed dogs could weigh up to 107.3.

Calculating The Adult Weight Of A Large Breed Puppy

Large Breed Puppy Weight Chart

To determine the adult weight of a large breed pup when he is between two weights for his age, you can find the average of the two weights.

You also have the option of using your puppy’s growth rate. First, you will need to figure out your puppy’s growth rate, which is his current weight in pounds (at 20 weeks) divided by his current age in weeks.

Next, you should multiply the growth rate by 52. The result is the estimated weight of your puppy as an adult.

If you know your large breed puppy’s weight at six months old, you can use this method of calculating the adult weight. Firstly you should weigh him at six months, then multiply this amount by 2. The next step is to add this figure to half the weight at six months.

Giant Breed Puppy Growth Chart

Age Weight Weight Weight
8 weeks 17 lbs 19 lbs 21 lbs
10 weeks 22 lbs 24 lbs 27 lbs
12 weeks 26 lbs 29 lbs 32 lbs
14 weeks 30 lbs 34 lbs 28 lbs
16 weeks 35 lbs 39 lbs 43 lbs
5 months 37 lbs 41 lbs 45 lbs
6 months 56 lbs 62 lbs 69 lbs
7 months 64 lbs 72 lbs 79 lbs
8 months 75 lbs 84 lbs 92 lbs
10 months 92 lbs 103 lbs 113 lbs
12 months 112 lbs 125 lbs 138 lbs
18 months 165 lbs 185 lbs 205 lbs

Although there is some overlap with the large breed size at the lower end of the scale, the large breed category consists of breeds that are over 100 lbs.

Large breed dogs are comprised of dog breeds such as Great Pyrenees, Newfoundland, Leonberger, Irish Wolfhound, Bernese Mountain Dog, Great Dane, and Tibetian Mastiff.

Typically, giant breed dogs take a longer time to attain their adult weight which is at least 12 – 18 months of age.  Some Giant breeds that are at the top end of the scale, may even continue to grow up to 2 or 3 years old.

For example, dog breeds such as Newfoundlands, Great Dane’s, and Mastiffs, just to name a few. These giant dogs at the top of the scale will gain about 3 – 5 lbs per week and those at the lower end usually gain 2 – 3 lbs per week.

Use the following chart to get a rough idea based on his current weight, to estimate what your giant breed puppy will weigh when full-grown. Look for where he falls based on his current weight, but start with your puppy’s age along the left side column.

It’s important to note that, many giant breed dogs continue growing past 12 months, so your puppy may keep growing until he is 18 months old or even in some cases 3-years old. 

Calculating The Adult Weight Of A Giant Breed Puppy

Giant Breed Puppy Weight Chart

To determine the adult weight of a giant breed pup when he is between two weights for his age, you can find the average of the two weights. You also have the option of using your puppy’s growth rate.

First, you will need to figure out your puppy’s growth rate, which is his current weight in pounds (at 20 weeks) divided by his current age in weeks. Next, you should multiply the growth rate by 52. The result is the estimated weight of your puppy as an adult.

If you know your giant breed puppy’s weight at six months old, you can use this method of calculating the adult weight. Firstly, you should weigh him at six months, then multiply this amount by 2. The next step is to add this figure to half the weight at six months.

If you’re trying to use the chart to find your puppy’s adult, but notice his weight isn’t on there, it’s easy to find out what he weighed at a certain weight by looking at your vet’s record or receipt. 

Factors That Affect Your Puppy’s Size

Breed Size

The breed size has been known to affect your puppy’s development and different breeds develop and reach adulthood at different rates.

Even though the general rule of thumb is that dogs younger than one-year-old are seen as puppies, a puppy’s size can determine whether he reaches adult maturity before one year of age.

Some breeds have been documented to reach full maturity at closer to 24 months of age and some of them even older than that. Usually, larger dog breeds take a longer time to reach adulthood.

Genetics 

Genetic factors greatly affect your dog’s growth. These hereditary factors determine the growth rate as well as other essential factors that add to their development.

For example, if both parents are large, then the offspring will be also. The fully grown dog will be approximately the average of the parents’ sizes. 

Genetics

Gender 

Numerous research studies into dogs have found that sex differences in weight gain and development contribute to the size of your dog.

Male dogs, not surprisingly, tend to larger in early adolescence. Most dog breeds tend to have males slightly larger than their female counterparts.

A lot of the research concentrates on breed differences as the determining factor for growth rate with a few of them looking at sex as a factor.

Health & Nutrition

It is not often that we may hear of underfed puppies, but it does happen. In most cases, puppies are malnourished when their owners are feeding them incorrectly, as opposed to simply not feeding them enough.

If puppies are not fed a balanced diet suitable for a carnivore, poor growth and other health problems are likely to occur. Along with a proper diet, you should engage your puppy in adequate amounts of physical activity.

This allows him to develop strong bones and muscles. His mood will also be improved.

How Much Weight Should A Puppy Gain Per Week?

When it comes to the daily weight gain of a newborn puppy, there is no standard number that represents all puppies because there are different sizes and not all sizes grow at the same rate.

Toy breeds such as Chihuahua, Papillon, and Chinese Crested gain about 1 to 5 ounces per week. They reach their adult weight of around 2 to 7 pounds at the age of between 8 and 9 months.

Small breeds such as French Bulldog, Charles Spaniel, and Pug gain roughly 5 to 8 ounces per week. They reach their adult weight between 8 and 12 months and weigh between 12 and 25 pounds as adults.

Medium breeds such as Cocker Spaniel, Corgi, and Border Collie gain approximately 1 to 1.5 pounds per week.

They weigh between 25 and 50 pounds as adults and reach their adult weight at the age of between 10 and 12 months.

Large breeds such as Bloodhound, Alaskan Malamute, and German Shepherd gain around 2 pounds per week.

Breeds that are between 50 and 100 pounds are considered large breeds and they reach their adult weight between 18 months and one year.

Breeds that weigh above 100 pounds are considered giant breeds and they include Great Danes, Mastiffs, and Newfoundlands.

They gain between 2 and 5 pounds per week, and some reach their adult weight at 18 months while others take up to 2 and 3 years.

Puppy Development Stages

Puppy Development Stages

Neonatal Period: Birth – 3 Weeks

Dogs are born fully furred, in a delicate state as they are can’t look after themselves. They depend on their mother for warmth comfort and nourishment. 

His eyes and ears closed, so he cannot hear or see. His front feet have a bit of strength, and he can pull himself towards his mother for food and warmth.

If he is uncomfortable, he can cry, and his mother will respond to his cries by moving him towards her and licking him.

Newborn puppies require an optimal temperature to survive. They snuggle close to their mother, but they can’t walk yet because of their undeveloped muscles.

The puppies need this time with their mothers so that they may grow. He will grow rapidly, adding 5-10% of his body weight.

Socialization Period: 3 Weeks – 12 Weeks

Between 3-12 weeks, your puppy will go through many changes, as its muscles begin to get stronger. They become active, playful, and strong on their legs.

They play actively with their littermates and start moving away from the sleeping area to empty their bowels and bladder.

This is the stage when they may try to climb out of the whelping box. Also, their mother will start to spend more time away from the puppies.8 Weeks Puppy Weight Chart

She may re-join the family for more of each day if she lives indoors. He will also start getting quite a bit of his nourishment from puppy food. 

They need to be thoroughly socialized as during this time they become fearful of anything unfamiliar. Most puppies come to know house-training, learning to wait before eliminating, and start sleeping through the night without a potty break, at this stage.

Juvenile Period: 3 Months – 6 Months

During this stage, puppies start to lose that very young puppy ‘look’ and more closely resemble a miniature version of their adult selves.

Medium to large pups will reach about half their adult height by the end of the month. Puppies under four months don’t need formal walks, just lots of opportunities to play and run around in your garden or yard.

This is when some puppies become less dependent on their humans for security.

Make sure your puppy is close to you outdoors by changing direction frequently so that your puppy has to keep coming to find you. This is so that he will not get lost after straying too far.

Sexual Maturity: 6 months – 16 months

Unless you have had your puppy spayed or neutered, he/she now has an abundance of sex hormones coursing through the system.

These help to build his confidence and slow growth further. You should practice good outdoor management on walks so that good recall is maintained. 

6 Months Old Puppy Weight Chart

Once they have completed their first season, many female dogs are neutered. This is up to the owner. It is not advised to allow your dog to be impregnated on the first heat cycle as many are unprepared, and the risks are high.

Once your dog is 12 months old he can participate in more vigorous activities and sports.

Transition To Adult Period: 16 Months – 36 Months 

There is huge variation in the way in which dogs develop and mature. The puppy development stages and ages outlined above are a rough guide. Different dog breeds attain adulthood at different stages. When it comes to training, you get out what you put in. 

A full-grown dog is usually compact and muscular, with a well-balanced physique. Many dogs will continue to fill out their chests and gain muscle until they are two or sometimes three years old.

Mixed Breed Puppy Growth Chart

If you have recently bought or adopted a puppy and their parents are from different breeds, you might be wondering about their growth and how big they will get as adults.

There are a few ways of predicting the growth of your mixed puppy. First, if you know the specific mixed breed that your puppy is, use a dog weight chart by age and breed available online or even at your vet’s office to check their growth as they grow.

However, if you do not know the breed, you can do a DNA test to know which mixed-breed your puppy is, then check the mixed breed puppy growth chart for the weight and height changes.

Another way to tell how big your puppy will get is to meet the parents. If you are not able to meet both parents, meeting the mother and checking her weight and height can be a good calculator for your puppy’s weight and height.

Female puppies grow to be almost the size of their mother while male puppies are slightly larger than females.

Finally, you can ask your breeder about your puppy’s adult weight and height as they will have more information based on previous litters and the parents.

Also, you can check the paws of your puppy, especially if they are unusually large or small to know their adult size.

At What Age Do Puppies Reach Their Full Adult Height?

Many people would like to know how old are dogs when they stop growing. Depending mainly on the size and breed of your dog, physical maturity in terms of height is attained at different ages.

Smaller dog breeds complete their growth much sooner than big dogs, therefore it varies from dog to dog. 

Adult Dog Height

Even within a specific dog breed, dogs vary in the final size that they are likely to reach as well as in their growth rates.

It’s virtually impossible to accurately estimate exact weights at any of the main puppy development stages. There are not just differences between breeds and among the same breed, but also even between litter-mates.

Does The Smallest Puppy In A Litter Stay The Smallest? 

It can be a struggle to get enough attention from mum sometimes, particularly in large litters as it is often harder to make sure no puppy gets left out.

Nevertheless, being the smallest puppy in a litter isn’t necessarily a death sentence.  There should be no issue if they’re still within the healthy weight range for their breed and age, and growing at an appropriate rate. 

Sometimes the newborn puppy’s birth weight is considerably low and falls outside their healthy range for their breed. These puppies frequently struggle to gain weight after birth and are slow to develop.

With the advice from your vet and special care and attention, you can ensure that a pup like this does not remain the smallest. It may be special care in feeding, exercise, or even supplements for growth.

What If My Puppy Grows Too Fast Or Too Slow

There may be times when your vet feels that the growth of your dog is too slow or too fast. You would need to regulate the amount of food you feed your puppy. You can add additional supplements to your puppy’s diet to make the food more nutritious.

Puppy Growth Rate

However, you should avoid free-feeding your puppy as you risk allowing it to grow faster than you anticipate. Monitor his weight and verify with your vet.

Can Spaying & Neutering Affect My Puppy’s Growth 

Since your dog’s sex hormones are involved in the puppy development stages, neutering affects the final size of your dog. These hormones tell your dog’s body to ‘stop growing’.

When a dog is neutered before the completion of his physical development, he will carry on growing for longer because he lacks the sex hormones to switch off that growth. Therefore, a neutered dog may end up being taller than his entire litter. 

Puppy Weight Chart FAQs

8-Week-Old Puppy Size

The size of an 8-week-old puppy depends on which size they are. The size range for each breed type is listed below:

  • Toy breeds – 11 to 39 ounces.
  • Small breeds – 1.5 to 4 pounds.
  • Medium breeds – 4 to 8 pounds
  • Large breeds – 9 to 15 pounds.
  • Giant breeds – 16 to 20 pounds.

3-Month-Old Puppy Size

Below is the weight of a 3-month-old puppy depending on size:

  • Toy breeds – 15 to 53 ounces.
  • Small breeds – 2 to 6 pounds.
  • Medium breeds – 6 to 12 pounds
  • Large breeds – 14 to 23 pounds.
  • Giant breeds – 24 to 30 pounds.

4-Month-Old Puppy Size

The weight of a 4-month-old puppy depending on their size is listed below:

  • Toy breeds – 20 to 70 ounces.
  • Small breeds – 3 to 8 pounds.
  • Medium breeds – 8 to 16 pounds.
  • Large breeds – 18 to 30 pounds.
  • Giant breeds – 32 to 42 pounds.

Final Words

These dog weight charts by age and breed, and formulas, are guidelines that help you to estimate the future weight of your puppy and his development as a dog.

Please keep in mind that all puppies and dogs grow at different rates, so all formulas and charts are based on average growth rates.

This means that the figures may vary slightly based on your dog’s genetics, lifestyle, and nutrition. Many of them will not develop at the same rate but will have little growth spurts along the way.

About the author

Adriana

Adriana has been around dogs since she was a little kid. It all started with growing up with a German Shepherd Lord and an English Cocker Spaniel Bady. Her dream job has always been becoming a veterinarian. She has been taking care of animals all of her life and she wants to share her experience with other dog lovers.