Dog Food

How Much To Feed A Miniature Schnauzer Puppy? 4 Week – 6 Week – 8 Week Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppies

How Much To Feed Miniature Schnauzer
Written by Adriana

The Miniature Schnauzer is a small dog with a big personality and the looks to go with it.

With his long beard and bushy eyebrows that make him look like an old man, this dog is one of the most popular breeds in at least three countries: the US, Germany, and Britain.

This extroverted little dog is great company, but has a lot of energy and demands attention. While they are loyal to their family and fun to be with, Schnauzers can get into scrappy fights with other dogs, no matter what the size of the other dog!

These dogs like to beg for food and it’s easy to give in to them, but one shouldn’t. If you want to know how much to feed a Miniature Schnauzer puppy, keep reading.

How Much Should A Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Eat?

Miniature Schnauzer Diet

There is no simple answer to this question as no two dogs are the same. Every miniature schnauzer has unique needs.

For instance, if your dog is a high-energy dog, it will need more calories per day than its couch potato neighbor.

These dogs don’t know when to stop eating, so you must take control of the amount of food your dog consumes every day.

Having said that, most miniature Schnauzers weigh between 12 and 20 pounds, so they don’t need a lot of calories. How much you feed your dog depends on its energy levels, weight, and age.

A heavier dog will need more food. In general, Miniature Schnauzers need between 150 and 480 calories per day.

Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Feeding Chart 

It is not easy to know how much to feed a Miniature Schnauzer puppy. They are tiny and don’t need a lot of food, but when they are still puppies, they eat more than when they are fully grown because they need to grow.

To be healthy, these little dogs need lots of calories.

As a general rule, you can feed your puppy about ½ cup of high-quality dog food per pound of weight. This amount should be spread over three or four meals over the day.

Whatever you do, make sure that you feed your dog high-quality food for miniature breed puppies. If you are in any doubt about how much to feed your puppy, consult your vet.

2 Week Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppy 

Miniature Schnauzer Food

You don’t have to be concerned about how much to feed your 2-week-old puppy. It will only need its mother’s milk. All it wants to do is drink and be warm, and both of those needs she can provide for him her puppies.

At birth, the average Mini Schnauzer weighs between 4 to 9 ounces, and by two weeks of age, they have doubled their birth weight.

4 Week Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppy  

4-week-old puppies are still nursing from their mothers, and they should not be taken away from her permanently. They can be taken to other areas to see other animals and people and to hear new sounds.

By now, the puppies are steady on their feet. They need many socializing and stimulating experiences to develop their confidence.

They still regular interaction with their mother to learn where they fit in the family and when to submit to authority.

6 Week Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppy  

By six weeks, Schnauzer puppies weigh just under a pound. They should be fed about a ¼ cup of food 2 – 3 times a day. The food should not be dry food, it should be moistened dry food.

Socialization at this stage is critical. Puppies need to have as many different experiences as possible so they can handle unfamiliar situations in the future.

Dogs who are not properly socialized at this stage will be fearful and suspicious and inclined to act defensively. This is the time to start leaving puppies on their own for short periods so they don’t suffer from separation anxiety later on.

8 Week Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppy  

By this time, puppies will have started with their toilet training. The breeder would have separated their sleeping quarters that their toilet area to encourage the puppies to know when and where to do their business.

8-week-old puppies weigh roughly 1 – 2 pounds. They should also get moistened dry food three times a day, also about a ¼ cup.

In this last month, before they go to their new homes, the puppies will sleep alone and away from their siblings so they can get used to being on their own. They will be taken to the vet for a final health check before going to their new family.

Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Diet

10 Week Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppy    

At this stage, the puppies weigh about 3 – 5 pounds. They need still need ¼ cup of moistened dry food three times a day.

Find out from the breeder what food your puppies have been given and start with the same food if you can. If you decide to change your dog’s food, do it gradually.

At this stage, your puppy will go through times of intense activity, exploring its environment and getting into everything, and then suddenly settling down for a couple of hours sleep.

12 Week Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppy 

Up to 12 weeks of age your puppy might still struggle to control his bladder and defecation. There are frequent accidents, especially if you don’t take your dog out during the night. You should start house training as soon as your puppy arrives at your home.

At 12 weeks puppies are busy and energetic. They need to be trained about the rules of the home they live in. Your puppy is ready to learn his name and a few basic commands.

A 12-week-old Miniature Schnauzer will weigh around 6 -8 pounds. You can now transition your dog to dry food. You can give your dog 1/3 cup of high-quality dry food for miniature dogs three times a day.

Best Puppy Food For Miniature Schnauzer

Miniature Schnauzer Feeding

Editor’s Choice

#1. Royal Canin Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Dog Food

This dog food is specially formulated for Miniature Schnauzers from 8 weeks to 10 months old.

Pros

  • Specially designed for the needs of this breed
  • Contains prebiotics and probiotics to support balanced intestinal flora
  • Reduced fat content necessary for this breed
  • Includes antioxidants to fight against free radicals
  • Special kibble design for easy eating

Cons

  • Some dogs quickly go off the formula and start refusing it
  • Expensive for what it offers
  • Limited range of bag sizes

Runner-Up

#2. Hill’s Science Diet Puppy Dog Food

Hill’s Science Diet Puppy Small & Toy Breed Dry Dog Food is formulated for small and toy breed puppies, as well as pregnant and nursing dogs.

Made from healthy ingredients, it provides dogs and puppies with complete nutrition. All ingredients are guaranteed pure and nutritious.

Pros

  • Balanced formula
  • Contains real food like savory chicken meal and barley
  • Includes high-quality fish for healthy brain and eye development
  • Antioxidant blend for support of the immune system
  • No artificial colors, flavors or preservatives

Cons

  • Some puppies dislike this formula
  • Occasionally causes diarrhea

#3. Royal Canin Small Puppy Dry Dog Food

Small dogs have special requirements. They spend a lot of energy and have high-calorie demands while they are growing.

The manufacturers of the Royal Canin Small Puppy Dry Dog Food realize this and have created a special formula for puppies that belong to a small breed.

Pros

  • Designed to be easily digestible and absorbable for small breeds
  • Special proteins to ensure nutrient absorption
  • Specific nutrients for digestive health
  • Special kibble technology that minimizes tartar on teeth

Cons

  • Dogs can go off this food when the manufacturer changes the formula
  • Contains chicken by-product meal, not real chicken, which is bad for dogs

#4. Solid Gold Mighty Dog Food

This dog food uses chicken and vegetables to provide a balanced food for miniature dogs. The recipe includes vegetables and chicken that are easy to digest, as well as a blend of ingredients and omega fatty acids.

Pros

  • Specially developed for toy and small breed dogs.
  • Includes probiotics for gut health.
  • No grains and gluten
  • Easily digestible protein
  • Includes a wide range of healthy foods like vegetables, berries, and lentils

Cons

  • Some dogs refuse this food and don’t seem to flourish on it
  • The kibble size is too small – some dogs just swallow it whole instead of chewing it

Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Feeding Schedule

#5. Purina Pro Plan Puppy Small Dog Food

Previously known as Purina Pro Plan FOCUS, this formula is especially for small breed puppies. Featuring chicken and rice, this dog food is a healthy option for your Miniature Schnauzer.

Pros

  • The first ingredient is real chicken, providing high-quality protein for optimal muscle building
  • Includes DHA from fish oil for healthy brain and vision
  • Live probiotics for support of the digestive system
  • Includes antioxidants for a healthy immune system
  • No artificial colors or flavors

Cons

  • Consumers remark that the food is often out of stock
  • Some dogs don’t take to the taste at all

Understanding Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Nutritional Needs 

Like all dogs, Miniature Schnauzers need a minimum amount of calories per day to be healthy. They get their energy from the proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in their food.

The appropriate amount of calories a Schnauzer needs on a daily basis depends on the age of the dog, its activity level, and whether the dog is lactating. Here is a calorie calculator that can help you work out what your dog needs.

Many Schnauzers are allergic to some of the ingredients in commercial dry pet food, such as preservatives, colorants, and grains.

The breed tends to suffer from high cholesterol and pancreatitis and hyperlipidemia, so owners must be careful about their dog’s fat intake. Treats between meals are best avoided.

Kibble vs Wet Food For Miniature Schnauzer Puppies 

There are excellent brands of dry dog food specially developed for Miniature Schnauzers. Due to convenience and time constraints, most owners settle for this option.

Wet dog food formulas have a level of water content that makes the food moist. Most dogs prefer wet food to dry food as it is clearly more palatable.

Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Feeding Chart

Usually, a dog that refuses its food can be tempted to eat with some wet food. Wet food is also a solution for dogs who have tooth problems or, for some reason, find it difficult to eat kibble.

There are also dog owners who believe that the best food for a dog is raw food, so-called barf. However, cooking a balanced meal for your dog at home is no simple matter.

You can’t just cook anything and give it to your dog. Most people can’t get a balanced meal for themselves right, let alone a balanced diet for a dog.

2-Month-Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Weight 

At birth, the Miniature Schnauzer is really tiny. It is only 3 to 7 inches long and weighs a few ounces – between 4 to 9 ounces. During the first two weeks, the puppies double their birth weight.

At one-month Miniature Schnauzer puppies have put on another couple of ounces, and by two months, they double their weight again. They now weigh roughly 3 to 5 pounds.

3-Month-Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Weight

When your Schnauzer puppy reaches three months, its weight is about half of what its weight will be as an adult. Your puppy will now weigh 5 – 8 pounds.

4-Month-Old Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Weight 

At four months, your puppy will weigh roughly 7 to 10 pounds.

How Much Do Miniature Schnauzer Puppies Grow Each Week?

All puppies grow at their own rate; that is why there is a range of weights for every age. In the first few weeks of life, Schnauzers grow fast, doubling their weight every couple of weeks.

They grow very fast right after birth when they weigh only 4 – 9 ounces. They grow so fast after birth that they double their weight a few times by the time they are four months old. At that stage, they weigh about 6 to 10 pounds, and they don’t grow much more after that.

By six months, the puppies have reached 75% to 85% of their adult weight. The puppies will weigh between 8 and 17 pounds, which is quite a difference.

Best Food For Miniature Schnauzer

At this stage, the smaller puppies might still grow a bit, but the larger puppies are close to their adult weight and size.

Always keep in mind that these are figures for specific dogs and they may not apply to your dog. All weight charts are estimates that don’t apply to all dogs.

Switching From Puppy Food To Adult Food 

The secret to successfully transitioning from puppy food to adult food is to do it over time. When you start out, mix a small amount of the adult food in with your puppy’s dog food.

Increase that amount slowly over a week or more while you decrease the puppy food.

After 7 to 10 days, your dog should only get adult dog food. There are two reasons for doing the switch slowly: it gives the dog time to get used to the new food over time, and the dog’s body gets time to adjust to the new food, avoiding any indigestion issues.

What If My Miniature Schnauzer Won’t Eat?

There are several reasons why your dog may go off its food. It may be hormonal issues, a minor infection, tooth problems, or more serious medical problems.

It may also be that you have one of those Schnauzers who are picky about their food and won’t be satisfied with anything.

Remember, you don’t have to stick with food specifically for Schnauzers; any good quality dog food will do. Just be sure not to buy one that includes grains, and if the one you choose has grains, go for rice rather than wheat.

Also, many dog owners have found that dogs that don’t like dry dog food, often love a raw food diet. You could try that, but it will be time-consuming for you.

How Much Water Should A Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Drink? 

Always have a bowl of freshwater for your dog where it’s easy to reach. The average dog needs from 1/2 ounce to 1 ounce of water per pound of body weight every day. One cup of water is eight ounces of water.

So, if a puppy weighs 20 pounds, it would need roughly 10 to 20 ounces of water per day. That is a little more than one cup of water to two and a half cups of water.

Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Food

Unless you live in a very hot climate, you don’t need to worry about this. If there is water available for your dog, it will drink enough to keep hydrated.

Can You Freefeed A Miniature Schnauzer Puppy? 

Free feeding is never a good idea, but especially so for Schnauzer puppies. This breed doesn’t know when to stop eating, and as long as there is food in the bowl, your dog will keep on eating.

Since these dogs tend to get overweight and are prone to health conditions like diabetes and pancreatitis, it’s best not to leave your dog to its own devices as far as eating habits are concerned.

Some Schnauzers also have sensitive stomachs, so it’s best to feed these dogs on a regular schedule and not allow them to overeat.

Should You Feed A Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Supplements? 

Most high-quality dog food contains all the protein, fat, minerals, and vitamins a dog needs to be healthy. It’s unlikely and unnecessary in most cases to give dogs supplements.

Unless your dog has been diagnosed with a serious health condition, just focus on feeding it a healthy balanced diet and don’t be too concerned about giving it supplements.

On the other hand, if you are feeding your dog a raw diet, you might want to supplement its diet with something extra to make sure it gets in all it needs.

How Much Exercise Does A Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Need A Day? 

Schnauzers are high-energy dogs and need daily exercise. They take well to suburban life but really love space to run around. Always remember, these dogs can gain weight quickly if they don’t get regular daily exercise.

The Miniature Schnauzer is not a lazy-about dog. Even in the house, he is on the move all the time.

To give your dog exercise, you can take it for a 45-minute walk every day, or you can take it for a shorter walk but then play with it in the yard throwing some balls and toys around. You’ll both have fun.

About the author

Adriana

Adriana has been around dogs since she was a little kid. It all started with growing up with a German Shepherd Lord and an English Cocker Spaniel Bady. Her dream job has always been becoming a veterinarian. She has been taking care of animals all of her life and she wants to share her experience with other dog lovers.